Fake Assignments of Mortgage+fraud+Micheal Koch+NDEx Technologies, LLC+Steven Kane+Scott Anderson+John Cody+Tamara Price+Dory or Dorey Coebel+Bernice Thell+Sarah Rubin+Amy Payment+Joseph Alvarado+Felix Amenumey+Pam Anderson+Sarah Block+Janette Boatman+Sheri Bongaarts+Christopher Bray+Tammy Brooks-Saleh +Tammy Saleh+Jacqueline Brown+Paul Bruha+Rodney Cadwell+Hari Charagundla+Robyn Colburn+ Frank Coon+Julie Coon+Jeremy Cox+Yvette Day+Teresa Debaker+Larry Dingmann+Jason Dreher+Kimbretta+ Duncan+Salina Edwards+Fedelis Fondunghallah+Fanessa Fuller+Elizabeth Gereschlaeger+Fanessa Fuller+Elizebeth Geretschlaeger+Fanessa Fuller+Peggy Glass+Steven Grout+Cathy Hagstrom+Paul Hunt+Etsuko Kabeya+Jamil Kahin+Pam Kammerer+Gloria Karau+Scott Keller+Kyurstina Lawton+lindsey Lesch+Whittney Lewis+Brock Martin+Joel Martinson+Donna Mc Nahght+Marisa Menza+Steve Moe+Toylor Moore+Annmarie Morrison+Melissa Mosloski+Kim Mullins+Susan Nigtingale+Richard Olasande+Ingrid Pittman+Rona Ramos+Paige Sahr+Kimberly Sanford+Erica Spencer+Renae Stanton+Maya Stevenson+Maya Stevenson+September Stoudemire+Emmanuel Tabot+Kae Maney Kue Vang+Rebecca Verdeja+Kim Waldroff+Katrina Whitfield-Bailey+Katrina Whitfield+Katrina Bailey+Jerry Yang+Mellisa Ziertman+Katie Zrust+Roy Stringfellow+Amie Davis+Andrew Keardy+Tina Jones+Jamie Bilot+Vicki Kyle+Bernadette Polux+Charmaine Marchesi+Verdine A. Freeman+Hang Luu+Vishal Karingada+Dulce Diaz+Butler & Horsch, P. A.+R.P. Umali+Michele Boiko+Eileen J. Gonzales+Je4ff Rivas+Marcia Medley+Laura Hescott+Treva Moreland+Kim Kinney+Peter read+Judith Stone+Shivani L. Ram+Amy Jo Cauthern-Munoz+Dawn L. Reynolds+Sara Rubin+Bharati Lengade+Melony Moore+Angela L. Freckman+Kim Kinney+Jennifer Duncan+Jann Zimmerman+Steve Ballman+Anne Sutcliffe+Judy Faber+Martha Kunkie+Natalie Anderson+Scott Anderson+Scott W. Anderson+Joseph Lutz+Varsha Thakka+Michael Hanna+Ann Pinto+Toccoa Lenair+Vinod Vishwakakarma+Leticia Arias+Mutra Kumar+Sukhada Lad+Fifi Volgarakis+Silvia Marchan+Sue Filiczkowski+Janice M. Baker+Aimee Austin+Keith Chapman+Richard delgado+Neil. E Dyson+Renee L. Hensley+Joseph P. Hillery+Robert E. Kaltenbach+Brian J. LaForest+Michael H. Moreland+Steve A. Neilsen+Keith S. Reno+Margery A. Rotundo


Fake Assignments of Mortgage+fraud+Micheal Koch+NDEx Technologies, LLC+Steven Kane+Scott Anderson+John Cody+Tamara Price+Dory or Dorey Coebel+Bernice Thell+Sarah Rubin+Amy Payment+Joseph Alvarado+Felix Amenumey+Pam Anderson+Sarah Block+Janette Boatman+Sheri Bongaarts+Christopher Bray+Tammy Brooks-Saleh +Tammy Saleh+Jacqueline Brown+Paul Bruha+Rodney Cadwell+Hari Charagundla+Robyn Colburn+ Frank Coon+Julie Coon+Jeremy Cox+Yvette Day+Teresa Debaker+Larry Dingmann+Jason Dreher+Kimbretta+ Duncan+Salina Edwards+Fedelis Fondunghallah+Fanessa Fuller+Elizabeth Gereschlaeger+Fanessa Fuller+Elizebeth Geretschlaeger+Fanessa Fuller+Peggy Glass+Steven Grout+Cathy Hagstrom+Paul Hunt+Etsuko Kabeya+Jamil Kahin+Pam Kammerer+Gloria Karau+Scott Keller+Kyurstina Lawton+lindsey Lesch+Whittney Lewis+Brock Martin+Joel Martinson+Donna Mc Nahght+Marisa Menza+Steve Moe+Toylor Moore+Annmarie Morrison+Melissa Mosloski+Kim Mullins+Susan Nigtingale+Richard Olasande+Ingrid Pittman+Rona Ramos+Paige Sahr+Kimberly Sanford+Erica Spencer+Renae Stanton+Maya Stevenson+Maya Stevenson+September Stoudemire+Emmanuel Tabot+Kae Maney Kue Vang+Rebecca Verdeja+Kim Waldroff+Katrina Whitfield-Bailey+Katrina Whitfield+Katrina Bailey+Jerry Yang+Mellisa Ziertman+Katie Zrust+Roy Stringfellow+Amie Davis+Andrew Keardy+Tina Jones+Jamie Bilot+Vicki Kyle+Bernadette Polux+Charmaine Marchesi+Verdine A. Freeman+Hang Luu+Vishal Karingada+Dulce Diaz+Butler & Horsch, P. A.+R.P. Umali+Michele Boiko+Eileen J. Gonzales+Je4ff Rivas+Marcia Medley+Laura Hescott+Treva Moreland+Kim Kinney+Peter read+Judith Stone+Shivani L. Ram+Amy Jo Cauthern-Munoz+Dawn L. Reynolds+Sara Rubin+Bharati Lengade+Melony Moore+Angela L. Freckman+Kim Kinney+Jennifer Duncan+Jann Zimmerman+Steve Ballman+Anne Sutcliffe+Judy Faber+Martha Kunkie+Natalie Anderson+Scott Anderson+Scott W. Anderson+Joseph Lutz+Varsha Thakka+Michael Hanna+Ann Pinto+Toccoa Lenair+Vinod Vishwakakarma+Leticia Arias+Mutra Kumar+Sukhada Lad+Fifi Volgarakis+Silvia Marchan+Sue Filiczkowski+Janice M. Baker+Aimee Austin+Keith Chapman+Richard delgado+Neil. E Dyson+Renee L. Hensley+Joseph P. Hillery+Robert E. Kaltenbach+Brian J. LaForest+Michael H. Moreland+Steve A. Neilsen+Keith S. Reno+Margery A. Rotundo

Here is a list of known ROBO signers, these people sign assignments of mortgages for banks and mortgage companies for a fee, they are not involved with the loans and normally they are listed as vice presidents of the banks they sign for.
Mortgage Affidavits and assignments and Endorsements are fake if any of the above people signed them or if the items listed below occur
The document was motorized in Dakota County, Minnesota, or in Hinnepin County MN, or in Duval County Florida or in San Diego CA.
The document was executed the same day of the court filing.
Party signed as authorized agent, or attorney in fact for servicer or creditor or Mers.
Name of servicer or creditor is stamped in block letters.
Document appears to be standard form with fill in the blanks for names and signors.
Paragraph numbers are not consistant
Party and Notary are the same person
Name of signor is not readable.
The signature of signor consists of loop in the form of an S or an 8
The dates of the signor as stated and the date of the notary are different.
The signor is the vice president of many banks
Contains many stamped names and dates.
The doucument has a last page or another page and the fonts are different.
Backdating of dates when the company or bank is out of business
Officers of Mers are signors.
The party signing is a representative of the servicer.
No notary seal.
No notary signature.
Name of party appearing before notary is blank.
Endorsement is in the form of an along, when there is room on the note to place endorsement.
Document is signed say June first 2008, but effective April 1, 2005.
The document pretents to name the trust as the owner signed by an agent for the originator by the servicer.
*The mortgage is assigned, rather than endorsed from one party to a next.
*The mortgage is endorsed from the originator to a trust.
*The affidavit is a lost note affidavit.
*The affidavit was signed by NDEx Technologies, LLC or has NDEx information on the document as an identification number.
*The affidivit was signed by the same attorney who signed the complaint.
==============================
2007-19165
MERS FREMONT INVESTMENT & LOAN
CALIFORNIA – ORANGE COUNTY
Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC
Tom Croft and others
CALIFORNIA – SAN DIEGO COUNTY
Chase Home Finance
FLORIDA – BROWARD COUNTY
Patricia Arango, Caryn Graham and others
Law Offices of Marshal Watson
FLORIDA – BROWARD COUNTY
Cheryl Samons, Beth Cerni and others
Law Offices of David Stern
FLORIDA – DUVAL COUNTY
Lender Processing Services
Valerie Broom, Margaret Dalton, Michele Halyard, Michael Hunt, Joseph
Kaminsky, Kathy Smith, Coleman Stokes and others
FLORIDA- HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY
Florida Default Law Group or Law Offices of Daniel Consuegra
FLORIDA – PALM BEACH COUNTY
Ocwen Loan Servicing
Scott Anderson, Oscar Taveras, Doris Chapman, Jonathan Burgess, Laura
Buxton and others
FLORIDA – PINELLAS COUNTY
Nationwide Title Clearing
Bryan Bly, Vilma Castro, Dhurato Doko, Jessica Fretwell and others
GEORGIA – FULTON COUNTY
Lender Processing Services
Linda Green, Korell Harp, Jessice Ohde, Linda Thoresen, Tywanna Thomas,
Cheryl Thomas, Christie Baldwin and others
MINNESOTA -DAKOTA COUNTY
Lender Processing Services
Liquenda Allotey, Topeka Love, Christine Anderson, Christine Allen, Eric Tate
OHIO – FRANKLIN COUNTY
Chase Home Finance
Christina Trowbridge, Whitney Cook and others
PENNSYLVANIA – ALLEGHANY COUNTY
Home Loan Services, Inc.
PENNSYLVANIA – MONTGOMERY COUNTY
GMAC (and Homecomings Financial)
Jeffrey Stephan, John Kerr and others
SOUTH CAROLINA – YORK COUNTY
America’s Servicing Company
John Kennerty, China Brown and others
TEXAS – COLLIN COUNTY
BAC Home Loan Servicing, f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP
TEXAS – DALLAS COUNTY (COPPELL, TX)
American Home Mortgage Servicing
TEXAS – HARRIS COUNTY
Litton Loan Servicing, LP
Marti Noriega, Denise Bailey, Diane Dixon and others
TEXAS – TARRANT COUNTY
Saxon Mortgage Services
TEXAS – TRAVIS COUNTY
IndyMac Bank Home Loan Servicing
Brian Burnett, Kristen Kemp, Suchan Murray, Chamagne Williams and others
TEXAS – WILLIAMSON COUNTY
IndyMac Bank (years after IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. ceased to exist, many of the signers will sign as officers of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. (the entity that should have made the assignment to the trust years ealier)
Erica A. Johnson-Seck, Dennis Kirkpatick, Eric Friedman and others
UTAH
SALT LAKE COUNTY
Select Portfolio Servicing
Luisa Alfonso, Bill Koch and others
Many mortgage-backed securitized trusts are missing critical documents needed to foreclose – i.e., the mortgage assignment. An excellent discussion of this is found in the decision of Massachusetts Land Court Judge Keith Long reaffirming a 2009 ruling (Ibanez) that invalidated foreclosures on two properties because the lenders did not hold clear title to the properties at the time of the foreclosure sale. Mortgage assignments were a key issue in Ibanez, a case that involved ineffective assignments to the Trust. Judge Long noted:
…the plaintiffs’ own securitization documents required mortgage assignments to be made to the plaintiffs in recordable form for each and every loan at the time the plaintiffs acquired them. Surely, compliance with this requirement would (and certainly should) have been a priority for an entity issuing securities dependent on recoveries from loans, such as these, known from the start to have a higher than normal risk of delinquency and default. U.S. BANK, N.A. v. Antonio Ibanez, et al.,Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Land Court Dept., 08 MISC 384283 (KCL).
This Ibanez decision and many others deal with the issue of mortgage assignments prepared years after the closing date of the trust, usually when the Trustee or mortgage servicer has realized that the Trust does not have the assignment needed to foreclose or has a defective assignment – such as one issued in blank, unsigned and undated.
Many trusts and servicers try to replace the missing assignments, often with assignments executed within a few months of the foreclosure – and in many cases even after the foreclosure is filed or the home is sold (in non-judicial foreclosure states). The date and place of the Assignment often reveals whether the Assignment is actually a “replacement” – issued years after the Trust closed, and even years after the original lender supposedly making the Assignment disappeared into bankruptcy.
The servicer rarely identifies itself and discloses that this is an attempt to replace a missing assignment. It is, therefore, very useful to know that Mortgage Assignments notarized in the counties above are more often than not replacement Assignments prepared by or on behalf of the Trusts – by the servicers for the Trust or document preparation companies working for the servicers, or even law firm employees working for the Trust.
By Prashant Gopal
March 31 (Bloomberg) — During the U.S. housing boom, even amateur investors could buy and sell a property within a couple of months and turn a profit. Today there’s nothing amateur about house flipping.
Homes with punctured walls and missing appliances draw multiple offers from professional investors at auctions in foreclosure-ridden states such as Arizona, California, Florida and Nevada. Competition is so stiff that experienced flippers such as Sergio Rodriguez and Brian Bogenn look back with nostalgia at last year, when they turned over 48 residences in the Phoenix area.
“A year ago, bums outnumbered bidders at the courthouse steps,” where many foreclosure auctions take place, Rodriguez said. “Now the bums are way outnumbered.”
In Phoenix, 4,661 foreclosed homes changed hands within six months of being purchased in 2009, an increase of 81 percent from the year earlier, according to RealtyTrac Inc., which sells foreclosure data. Flips in the California counties of Riverside and San Bernardino rose 45 percent to 17,203. In Las Vegas, which has the highest foreclosure rate in the country, they climbed 38 percent to 8,042.
Nationally, flipped homes gained 19 percent to 197,784 in 2009. Final figures may rise because some homes bought in the fourth quarter may get flipped this year, said Daren Blomquist, a spokesman at Irvine, California-based RealtyTrac.
FHA Waiver
Sales could get a lift from the Federal Housing Authority’s one-year waiver of anti-flipping rules that took effect Feb. 1, allowing FHA borrowers to acquire foreclosed homes from owners who have held title for less than 90 days. That gives first-time buyers a shot at investor-renovated homes, said Vicki Bott, a deputy assistant secretary at the Department of Housing and Urban Development in Washington.
The change also may help clear properties from markets such as Phoenix, where one in 124 homes in the metropolitan area received a foreclosure notice in February, the ninth-highest rate in the nation, according to RealtyTrac. Real estate values usually fall in neighborhoods littered with vacant homes.
The steps in front of the Maricopa County courthouse in downtown Phoenix are crowded most afternoons as dozens of people wearing sunglasses and ear buds plugged into their cell phones gather around auctioneers. The bidders speak in hushed voices by phone to the investors they represent — both flippers and those who plan to rent out the properties — as they work out their “number,” or maximum offer.
High-Stakes Poker
“It’s like a high-stakes poker game out here,” said Frank Gerola, 34, who represents buyers for PostedProperties.com, one of many companies that have sprouted up in Phoenix to serve flippers. “They want to know what you’re bidding on. You’ll have one guy bidding and another guy around him seeing if he can peek at his number,” said Gerola, who competes against representatives of companies such InvestAZHouses.com and TopPriorityInvestments.com.
Some investors try to cheat.
Hours before the foreclosure auction for 7848 East Pampa Avenue in Mesa, Arizona, visitors were greeted with a handwritten sign pasted to the inside of the front window:
“OCCUPIED. NO TRESPASSING,” read the note on the 12-year- old beige stucco house. “Needs carpet, paint. Tile is cracked.” It also warned of missing appliances and fissures in the pool and foundation.
New Paint, Carpet
It was a ruse, said Rodriguez and Bogenn, who checked out the house on March 18, the day after their $181,200 offer beat out a handful of bidders. An investor probably was trying to ward off competitors, Bogenn said. The house, which was vacant for months, only needed new paint, carpet, fixtures and a pool cleaning, they said. They planned to put it on the market this week for about $230,000.
Rodriguez, 31, and Bogenn, 47, didn’t see the house before making an offer. Like many investors, they subscribe to a service that checks titles and sends drivers to properties before the auction to relay photos and descriptions by mobile phone.
As the median existing price of U.S. homes climbed an average of 8.1 percent a year from 2000 to 2005, amateurs by the thousands jumped into flipping. Buying and selling homes with the aim of a quick profit was such an American obsession that it spawned two cable-television series — “Flip This House” on A&E and “Flip That House” on TLC — that debuted in 2005 as the market peaked.
The reality shows, now in re-runs, tracked people as they tried to flip a home.
Back to Flipping
“Amateur hour is over,” said Richard C. Davis, who created “Flip This House” and appeared in its first season.
Davis, now chief executive officer of Charleston, South Carolina-based Trademark Properties, said he has fixed and sold 25 properties since returning to the business in October and is filming a new series about multimillion-dollar homes built during the boom that he is buying, repairing and selling for half their original price.
“The professionals will make more money in a down market than they ever made during the boom,” Davis said.
In job markets decimated by the housing crash, flipping is also putting carpenters, construction workers and home inspectors back to work and attracting a new generation of real estate professionals.
Josip Eljuga, 25, left a $9-an-hour job as a lot attendant at a car dealership nine months ago to work as a driver, or runner, as he is sometimes called. The pay is better — about $14 per house — and the days are unpredictable.
Tell-Tale Signs
Sometimes occupants scream at him, other times he comforts them, he said. Most often, his knocks go unanswered, and it’s his job to find signs of occupancy — water flowing from the hose bib, a car in the garage, a container of coffee creamer left on the kitchen table. A rotting pumpkin mixed in with scattered toys in the backyard of a house on South 30th Avenue in Phoenix one recent afternoon suggested the four-year-old home had been vacant since some time after Halloween.
Eljuga wants to get into the flipping business and has already discussed pooling money with friends.
“It seems like there can be good money if you do it right,” he said. “Based on what I have seen, I think I have enough knowledge to do fairly well.”
Brandon Hunt, 28, said he and his business partner flipped 46 homes in the Phoenix area last year and made $1 million in profits. Hunt, who became a real estate agent during the housing boom, said he doesn’t have much in common with many of the flippers who jumped in at the top of the market. For one thing, he said, he buys low.
“There was no buying at the courthouse steps in 2005 and 2004, because there was no foreclosure,” Hunt said.
Helping Home Values
Another important difference, said 42-year-old Phoenix investor Harry D’Elia, is that flippers in 2010 are stabilizing neighborhoods.
“We’re the good guys because what’s happening is that the government doesn’t have enough money to fix these homes up,” said D’Elia, who also flipped properties during the boom.
The FHA has given investors such as D’Elia a new stream of potential customers with the flipping waiver.
“We do believe investors will play an important role in today’s marketplace because they tend to be more liquid than first-time homebuyers,” said Bott of Housing and Urban Development.
Hunt said the FHA waiver might take time to have an impact because cash buyers are easy to find. Selling to an FHA borrower requires added paperwork and two appraisals when a property is sold for more than 20 percent of the seller’s acquisition cost.
International Buyers
Investors expect to be busy for years to come as continued weakness in home sales fuels foreclosures, which will climb to more than 4.5 million this year from 3.96 million in 2009, according to an estimate by RealtyTrac. In February, sales of new homes in the U.S. fell 2.2 percent to a record low annual pace of 308,000, the Commerce Department reported March 24. Sales of existing homes dropped 0.6 percent last month to a 5.02 million annual level, the lowest in eight months, the National Association of Realtors said March 23.
U.S. median home prices dropped 28 percent to $165,100 in February from the peak in July 2006, according to the Washington-based trade group.
In Florida, which along with Arizona has the second-highest foreclosure rate in the U.S. after Nevada, international buyers are scooping up blocks of rehabbed houses, said real estate agent Brad Cozza.
Foreign Connections
“The investors are re-emerging,” said Cozza, who flips foreclosed homes in the Cape Coral area on the west coast of Florida to Israeli, German and Spanish investors and vacation- home buyers. “These are wealthy people who have considerable amounts of savings.”
In Lee County, Florida, which includes Cape Coral, flips almost tripled to 2,617 last year.
Cozza said his business got a boost after he gave a presentation to 925 Israeli investors last month in Tel Aviv. The conference was organized by America Israel Investments LLC, which buys foreclosed homes in Lee County and sells them to Israeli buyers. Edmon Mamane, the company’s owner, said he pays $48,000 to $60,000 for residences, some of which have never been lived in, and flips them for about $80,000.
Israeli real estate investor Dror Shlomi, 50, bought a 2,200-square-foot duplex from America Israel Investments a few weeks ago for $79,000; the two families occupying the four-year- old property pay a combined $1,300 a month in rent. Shlomi said he’s in the process of selling his 10 investment properties in Israel and shifting his focus to Florida.
“Last year, prices in Israel went up and in the states they went down, so we decided this is the right timing to try to find interesting things in the U.S.,” he said.
Grind It Out
Robert Fahn, 50, who along with a partner has bought and sold 10 homes in the Sacramento area since last February, said he’s pleased with his 10 percent to 15 percent profit margin. But the window for house flipping is closing as newcomers are bidding up prices, he said.
“If someone is thinking about quitting their day job, they should think twice because the market is going to go away at some point and margins are getting squeezed,” said Fahn, who is investigating opportunities in Florida and Phoenix.
“This is not a get-rich-quick business,” he said. “This is a grind-it-out business. But once you know how to do it, you only have to commit resources when the price is right.”
–Editors: Larry Edelman, Rob Urban
To contact the reporter on this story: Prashant Gopal in New York at pgopal2@bloomberg.net.
To contact the editor responsible for this story: Kara Wetzel at kwetzel@bloomberg.net.
REN_Joslin0416168
To thousands of homeowners whose loans have been shuttled from one company to another, the name “Bryan Bly” is very familiar.
Over the past few years, Bly has signed countless mortgage assignments as either a notary public or “vice president” of various lenders.
In reality, Bly works for Nationwide Title Clearing, a Palm Harbor company. And he was recently reprimanded by state regulators after acknowledging in a sworn statement that Nationwide Title had him notarizing so many documents that he scribbled his initial instead of signing his full name as required by law.
Such a pace, critics say, shows that Bly and other so-called “robo signers” can’t possibly be sure that what they’re signing is accurate.
“Our entire system of real estate is founded upon the ability of courts to believe in the documents before them,” says Matthew Weidner, a St. Petersburg lawyer who has a blog on foreclosure issues. “What this (Bly’s statement) describes is assembly-line document production with no concern for the facts in front of them.”
Bly’s name has become well known in the foreclosure defense field since theSt. Petersburg Times reported last year that he and Crystal Moore signed thousands of mortgage assignments as officers of Option One and other lenders even though both work for Nationwide Title.
Assignments are key in determining who actually owns a mortgage, an all-important matter as banks foreclose on loans that were bundled into securities and sold to investors. To expedite the processing of mortgage assignments, many banks authorize Bly, Moore and others at Nationwide Title to sign on their behalf.
In a statement Friday to the Times, Nationwide Title said it employs “many people” in various departments “to make sure that each and every document is legal, compliant and complete” when it reaches signers like Bly and Moore.
The company also said that it serves banks around the country and “is subject to their due diligence and quality control audits on a regular basis.”
The 2009 Times story caught the attention of Samuel Smart, a Naples homeowner whose loan has changed hands twice.
“The real concern I have, if I were to sell my house, who can legitimately sign off on my mortgage?” Smart said.
Last year, when MoreEquity Inc. transferred his loan to another company, Smart noticed that the mortgage assignment was signed by Crystal Moore as vice president of MoreEquity and notarized by Bly. However, Bly signed with only a B and not as “Bryan J. Bly,” the signature approved by the state.
Florida law says: “Once commissioned, the notary must sign precisely as commissioned by the state of Florida, in the exact name appearing on your notarial commission certificate.”
Smart complained to Gov. Charlie Crist’s office, which regulates notaries. Asked to respond to the complaint, Bly submitted a sworn statement that gave a glimpse into the workings of Nationwide Title Clearing.
“Depending on the needs of NTC’s customers, there were sometimes thousands of such documents to be notarized in a single day,” Bly’s statement said. “On those days, I would typically be notarizing documents for many hours.”
Bly said he noticed that other NTC employees whose names appeared on documents as vice presidents or witnesses were signing “only with their initials and sometimes squiggles that barely approximated initials.”
“Over time,” Bly continued, “the notarial signature I affixed to those documents became progressively shorter and shorter until at last I was merely signing B. I was not, at the time, aware that this could be characterized as a violation of state law.”
Bly’s statement said that on May 5, 2009 — two days after the Times story ran — Nationwide Title was told by its legal counsel that Florida law prohibits notaries from signing with anything but their commissioned signature. Bly said he tried to change his signature to the shorter B. Bly, but couldn’t until his notary commission expires in 2011.
As a result, he said, he was reassigned to a job that doesn’t involve notarizing documents.
This year, the governor’s office notified Bly that it had put a “formal reprimand” in his file that would be reviewed “if other complaints are filed against you for notary misconduct.”
Smart calls it a slap on the wrist.
“It’s yet another example that government regulation is lax or totally lacking,” said Smart, who owns a glass and mirror company. “The state kind of sanctioned him a little bit but didn’t even pull his license.”
Weidner, the St. Petersburg lawyer, said it is unlikely that an improper notary signature on a mortgage assignment would be enough to void a final judgment of foreclosure.
But “I think that catching that fact before a judgment is issued is certainly enough to prevent them from getting a judgment,” he said.
As the foreclosure rate soars, more and more judges are questioning documents put before them. According to the transcript of a recent hearing, Pinellas Circuit Judge Anthony Rondolino noted that the same individual alleged the same set of facts on affidavits filed in two different foreclosure cases. The only change was that the individual claimed to be a director of one company on one affidavit and director of another company on the second affidavit.
“That really increased my interest in this subject matter,” Rondolino said, “because … I don’t have any confidence that any of the documents the court’s receiving on these mass foreclosures are valid.”
(Rondolino was speaking in general, not referring to Nationwide Title Clearing or any specific company.)
In his new job with Nationwide Title, Bryan Bly has signed as “attorney in fact” for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., which took over IndyMac Bank last year and has been assigning its loans to other lenders. Some of Bly’s notary duties have been assumed by colleague Crystal Moore, who got her notary commission in September.
Moore’s state-approved signature assures that she can sign quickly but legally. It’s just the initials CM.
Susan Taylor Martin can be contacted at susan@sptimes.com.

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3 Responses to Fake Assignments of Mortgage+fraud+Micheal Koch+NDEx Technologies, LLC+Steven Kane+Scott Anderson+John Cody+Tamara Price+Dory or Dorey Coebel+Bernice Thell+Sarah Rubin+Amy Payment+Joseph Alvarado+Felix Amenumey+Pam Anderson+Sarah Block+Janette Boatman+Sheri Bongaarts+Christopher Bray+Tammy Brooks-Saleh +Tammy Saleh+Jacqueline Brown+Paul Bruha+Rodney Cadwell+Hari Charagundla+Robyn Colburn+ Frank Coon+Julie Coon+Jeremy Cox+Yvette Day+Teresa Debaker+Larry Dingmann+Jason Dreher+Kimbretta+ Duncan+Salina Edwards+Fedelis Fondunghallah+Fanessa Fuller+Elizabeth Gereschlaeger+Fanessa Fuller+Elizebeth Geretschlaeger+Fanessa Fuller+Peggy Glass+Steven Grout+Cathy Hagstrom+Paul Hunt+Etsuko Kabeya+Jamil Kahin+Pam Kammerer+Gloria Karau+Scott Keller+Kyurstina Lawton+lindsey Lesch+Whittney Lewis+Brock Martin+Joel Martinson+Donna Mc Nahght+Marisa Menza+Steve Moe+Toylor Moore+Annmarie Morrison+Melissa Mosloski+Kim Mullins+Susan Nigtingale+Richard Olasande+Ingrid Pittman+Rona Ramos+Paige Sahr+Kimberly Sanford+Erica Spencer+Renae Stanton+Maya Stevenson+Maya Stevenson+September Stoudemire+Emmanuel Tabot+Kae Maney Kue Vang+Rebecca Verdeja+Kim Waldroff+Katrina Whitfield-Bailey+Katrina Whitfield+Katrina Bailey+Jerry Yang+Mellisa Ziertman+Katie Zrust+Roy Stringfellow+Amie Davis+Andrew Keardy+Tina Jones+Jamie Bilot+Vicki Kyle+Bernadette Polux+Charmaine Marchesi+Verdine A. Freeman+Hang Luu+Vishal Karingada+Dulce Diaz+Butler & Horsch, P. A.+R.P. Umali+Michele Boiko+Eileen J. Gonzales+Je4ff Rivas+Marcia Medley+Laura Hescott+Treva Moreland+Kim Kinney+Peter read+Judith Stone+Shivani L. Ram+Amy Jo Cauthern-Munoz+Dawn L. Reynolds+Sara Rubin+Bharati Lengade+Melony Moore+Angela L. Freckman+Kim Kinney+Jennifer Duncan+Jann Zimmerman+Steve Ballman+Anne Sutcliffe+Judy Faber+Martha Kunkie+Natalie Anderson+Scott Anderson+Scott W. Anderson+Joseph Lutz+Varsha Thakka+Michael Hanna+Ann Pinto+Toccoa Lenair+Vinod Vishwakakarma+Leticia Arias+Mutra Kumar+Sukhada Lad+Fifi Volgarakis+Silvia Marchan+Sue Filiczkowski+Janice M. Baker+Aimee Austin+Keith Chapman+Richard delgado+Neil. E Dyson+Renee L. Hensley+Joseph P. Hillery+Robert E. Kaltenbach+Brian J. LaForest+Michael H. Moreland+Steve A. Neilsen+Keith S. Reno+Margery A. Rotundo

  1. Your post has a lot of important and factual details, including significant legal citations. Problem is, you should have first organised it and then write with at least some line space between paragraphs. Right now, it’s pretty hard-going to read it. It’s a shame that valuable information is lost because of presentation. This could have been an award-winning post. Thanks for letting me have my twopence worth.

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